Find your own melody

Every individual must find his own “melody” – his own special talents, abilities, and character traits that enable him to accomplish his own unique mission on earth.

Stop and think: Three times a day, we begin our prayers by appealing to the “G-d of Abraham, G-d of Isaac and G-d of Jacob.” Why don’t we just say “G-d of Abraham, Isaac and  Jacob.”  The answer is that each of our forefathers served Hashem in his own special way, without comparing himself to anyone else. Each had a special task on earth. Yet each was magnificent tzaddik in his own right.”

Once a person realizes that he has his own special “melody,” he doesn’t have to step to anyone else’s cadence and he doesn’t need to compare himself with anyone else. He serves Hashem according to his special talents and abilities.

Rabbi Arush, Garden of Wisdom, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

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Lessons from Avraham

No one could sway or confuse our forefather, Avraham. That’s why he was called HaIvri, which means the one from the other side of the river, for he was on one side and the entire world was on the other side, so to speak. The key to our happiness and sense of fulfillment is our ability to turn away from conformity with social norms that have nothing to do with truth. Knowing the truth gives a person confidence, conviction and inner strength – three valuable tools lacking in a conformist.

Rabbi Arush, Garden of Wisdom, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Thought for today – by Rabbi Danny Kirsch

When a new Torah Scroll was dedicated, R Moshe David of Chortkow took the Torah scroll and danced with it for a long time. It was an extraordinarily heavy scroll.
“Rebbe,”someone asked ,” isn’t it too heavy for you?”
“No” R Moshe David answered with a  smile. “If one keeps the Torah , it is never too heavy for him.”

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Positive Thinking – by Rabbi Danny Kirsch

When R Dov Ber of Metzritch was eight years old, there was a fire in his town, in which his home was consumed. His mother was inconsolable.
“Why are you crying so much?” asked the child. “Should one cry because a house burns down?”
“No, my son,” she replied, ” I am not crying for the house, but for the document bearing our family tree which was in it, and which went back to R Yochanan HaSandlar.”
“Don’t wory, Mother,” replied the child. “I will be the start of a new family tree.”

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Thought for today – by Rabbi Danny Kirsch

When R Yitzchak Meir of Gur was a young child, a man once said ” Yitzchak Meir , I will give you a gold coin if you can tell me where Hashem is”
“And I,” said R Yitzchak Meir, “will give you two gold coins if you can tell me Where He is Not,”

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Thought for today – by Rabbi Danny Kirsch

When the gaon of Vilna was a very young child, he went out to play with his little friends , they were playing on a seesaw and he left and came home.

“Eliyahu ” his father asked him “why didn’t you play with your friends ?”
“Father” he replied, “It states in the Torah, you shall love your Neighbour as Yourself. How can I go up on the seesaw when it means I cause my friend to go down?”

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Thought for today – by Rabbi Danny Kirsch

R Nasan tzvi of. Slabodka would say: The Torah is not too small for the greatest of the great, nor too great for the smallest of the small

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Keep it simple

The Evil Inclination puts up a wall of opposition to anyone that tries to pursue a path of simplicity and happiness, because this is the gateway to holiness. Therefore a person must be firm in his resolve and not allow anything to weaken him.

Rabbi Arush, Garden of Wisdom, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Enjoy the fruits of your labour

The Gemara (Berachot, 8a) says that someone who enjoys the fruit of his labour is greater than someone who fears Hashem. How can this be? The explanation is readily comprehensible: For a person to enjoy the fruit of his labour, he must be humble. How do we know if a person is humble? A humble person is happy with his lot in life; in other words, with whatever Hashem gives him.

Rabbi Arush, Garden of Wisdom, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Please listen to this… – contributed by Rabbi Jamie Cowland

When we listen, we open ourselves up to another way of thinking about, or experiencing what we are going through. The Torah is replete with references to listening and what it always seems to mean is that spiritual growth occurs when we open ourselves to another perspective, even if we end up disagreeing with it. Listening means to recognise that in Hashems world we dont have a monopoly on truth, and we dont even have a monopoly on the truth of our own experiences.

Let go of a negative interpretation of your experiences, and suspend judgement as to what you are going through in life is good or bad. When you do that, natural equilibrium returns, connection to Hashem returns, and we find the strength to give again.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will get. Keep them coming.

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net.