It’s not how you win, it’s how you fail that really counts

A person able to smile no matter what, who accepts unsuccessful situations with the same self-composure had he encountered succesful situations, shows Hashem that he has the ability to accept success, while leaving arrogance behind. That’s why Hashem often tests people with setbacks and disappointments; if they hold on to their emuna (that everything is from Hashem), they show that they are proper spiritual receptacles for the light of success.
Rabbi Arush, Garden of Wisdom, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

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If you have the determination to keep trying, eventually you will succeed – by Steven Mills

וַיַּחְפְּרוּ עַבְדֵי יִצְחָק בַּנָּחַל וַיִּמְצְאוּ שָׁם בְּאֵר מַיִם חַיִּים


“And Isaac’s servants dug in the valley, and they found there a well of fresh water”
Parsha – Toldos
Bereishis 26:19
Yitzchak dug and did not find water, but he kept digging in other places until he finally found what he was looking for.
Others quarreled with him and took over his wells, but still Yitzchak did not become discouraged.  He carried on digging until he finally found a well with water that he was able to use in peace.
 
The Chofetz Chaim explains that the lesson we should learn from this is the value of persistence.
Whether in spiritual or physical matters do not give up, especially when things first don’t work out as you’d hope.
Many people fail to accomplish something because they become disheartened.  But if you have the determination to keep trying, eventually you will succeed.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

You shall love your neighbour as yourself – by Darren Freedman

Rav Dessler writes:

If one were only to reflect that a ‘person comes to love the one to whom he gives’, he would realise that the only reason the other person seems a stranger to him is because he has not yet given to him; he has not taken the trouble to show him friendly concern. If I give to someone I feel close to him; I have a share in his being. It follows that if I were to start bestowing good upon everyone I came into contact with I would soon feel that they are all my relatives, all my loved ones. I now have a share in them all; my being has extended into all of them. By giving to him of yourself you will find in your soul that you and he are indeed one; you will find in the clearest possible manner that he really is to you ‘as yourself’

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Thought for today – by Rabbi Danny Kirsch

R Meir of Lublin once came to a city to raise money. For his yeshivah, yeshivas chachmei lublin,he spoke in the shul about the importance of supporting those who learn Torah , and aroused the congregation to donate generously .
After he had finished his speech , R Meir saw a child standing in the crowded shul,’my child ‘ R meir asked him ‘did you understand my speech?’
‘No’ answered the child truthfully , ‘ I didn’t, I only understood one thing ,that one must give money’
‘If you caught that’, said R Meir with a smile,’you understood my speech better than many of your elders’

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Infatuation can be created in a day. Love takes time – by Steven Mills

יִּקַּח אֶת רִבְקָה וַתְּהִי לוֹ לְאִשָּׁה וַיֶּאֱהָבֶהָ

“and he took Rebecca, and she became his wife, and he loved her”
Parsha – Chayei Sarah
Chapter 24, Verse 67

On the face of it, the Torah simply tells us that Yitzchak married Rivkah, and that he loved her.  Nothing too out of the ordinary there.

But if we look a little closer, we see that the order of events is highly significant.
We learn that first he married her, and then he loved her.

Love is not something that happens in an instant.  In the early days of a relationship, when people talk about ‘love at first sight’ or ‘falling in love’ this is often more of an infatuation than true love.  True love is not created in a day. It takes years to develop.  In our world of instant gratification this is difficult to appreciate, but it is nonetheless true.

Infatuation can be created in a day. Love takes time.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Spiritual v Physical pleasures

Physical pleasures have an extremely short existence. Immediately after one has gratified oneself, the pleasure is no longer there. But when one enjoys gaining wisdom, the pleasure is long lasting and the source of pleasure is constantly available.

Gateway to Happiness, Rabbi Pliskin

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Light at the end of the tunnel

Whenever we experience difficult times, we can be encouraged by the knowledge that Hashem always creates the remedy before He sends the infirmity. In other words, no matter how difficult the tribulation may appear to be, Hashem has already prepared the solution and salvation.
Rabbi Arush, Garden of Gratitude, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

Shabbat every day of the week

Rabbi Arush and Rabbi Pliskin come together on this idea: Shabbat is a great training ground for learning peace of mind. On Shabbat we switch off. We switch off our phones, we switch off our computers, and we switch off the frequency in our brain that is tuned into work. Rabbi Arush suggests that we spend 10, 15 or 60  minutes  in personal prayer (i.e. talking with Hashem alone in your own language) and by doing so we get to experience a piece of Shabbat every day . “It’s a mini Shabbat every day of the week, a break from the rat race and the crazy carousel of constant pressures. An hour of personal prayer is a gift of emotional rejuvenation, physical and mental health and self-composure.”

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

The root of our prayer service – by David Goodwin

Wow! I heard a chiddush from Rabbi Jonathan Sacks shlita today that was sooooo beautiful and knocked me’ socks off. I hope you agree.

Ever wondered why we repeat shemoneh esrei at Shacharit and Mincha but not at Maariv. What do you reckon? I always thought that it might be for those who arrive late, can’t read Hebrew or maybe even for those who are a bit hard of hearing!

In the Talmud the famous dispute between R. Yose ben R. Chanina and R. Yoshua ben Levi (Berachot 26b) draws our attention to two explanations about our 3 daily services. The former states that the prayers were instituted by the Patriachs – Avraham (Shacharit), Yitzhak (Mincha) and Yaakov (Maariv). We all know that one. Each Patriach can be sourced in the Torah as ‘having davened at these specific times’. Along comes R. Yoshua ben Levi and states that the prayers replaced the daily Temple sacrifices. The Talmud then goes on to bash out the debate.

So which is it? Well it’s both! Of course it is we’re Jewish! One viewpoint represents personal, prophetic, supplicatory, private prayer – symbolised by the prayers of our Avot; the other viewpoint is indicative of the priestly aspect of prayer – communal, continual and collective without the personal characteristic. Each highlights different functions of prayer itself. And where do we see every day of our lives that both of these aspects are still well preserved by the holy Nation of Israel? Well, consider this – we repeat shemoneh esrei only at Shacharit and Mincha because the Chazzan’s repetition – public, non personal, without private supplication – actually represents the priestly aspect of tefila having just been preceded by the personal, silent and private prayer of the individual. Silence is for the Avot; public is for priests. And why we don’t repeat at Maariv? Simple, because in the times of the Temple there was no evening sacrifice!!

mmmmm, tasty Torah!

Shavua tov holy ones.

ps my chiddush: check out the name of the Rabbis who brought these ideas out to the world. Regarding private supplications it was R. Yose ben R. CHANINA – root of CHANINA is Chet-Nun-Nun like Tachanun which means ‘supplication’ (which we pray at Shacharit and Mincha only). The second Rabbi is R. Yoshua ben LEVI – Levi being the tribe from which who come from? Yep, the Leviim, the priests! Nothing like our holy Torah right!

 

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.

The world revolves all around you

A person must feel that the whole world weas created especially for him. That doesn’t mean that we must feel smug and egotistical, Heaven forbid, but we should know that Hashem gives us an entire set of tools and circumstances which are conducive to accomplishing our needed soul correction and mission on earth.
Rabbi Arush, Garden of Wisdom, http://www.breslev.co.il.

These daily lifts are inspired by Jonny Chippeck and dedicated to his ‘refuah shleimah’. Get well soon Jonny!

Please step up to the plate and contribute your own small nugget of Torah by sending back to me at terence@speedquote.net. The more people we have contributing, the higher this daily lift will go. Keep them coming.